Home Living Abroad Sunrise at Surfside, Sliema, Malta

Sunrise at Surfside, Sliema, Malta

15 September, 2015 4 comments

I love sunrises in Malta, probably even more than sunsets, but I get to experience them much, much less (I am not a morning person). In September the sunrises at around 6:43 in Malta so I managed to set my alarm for 6:00AM, get out the door for about 6:20AM and get to Surfside, just in time to see the sky catch alight before the sun began to peek out from the sea across the horizon. I love sunrises in Malta the most as they happen at such a peaceful hour. It feels like there is a blanket of quiet, that only the chirping birds can penetrate. The sky goes from a deep, dusky navy hue to a watercolour blue in no time at all and then, out of nowhere, it turns a bloody red, just before the sun shows it’s face. I’ve said this before but it’s almost like it’s too intense for such a calm, quiet time of the day. The colours are screaming loud, demanding to be seen, to be loved.

Sunrise at Surfside, Sliema, Malta Sunrise at Surfside, Sliema, Malta

If you get there on time, you’ll be lucky enough to see the watercolours start to intensify and the pale pinks and baby blues transform into a deep sienna orange and a burnt umber reddish brown. At one point, once the sun is fully up, just sitting atop the water, the whole world seems to turn a deep, bloody red. The colours are such that you would think that they felt sinister or menacing and they certainly smash the calmness of the morning but they feel nothing but reassuring. Whatever awful things are going on in your life, or in the world at large, nature is always beautiful, solid, dependable.

Sunrise at Surfside, Sliema, Malta

There is a row of man made rockpools along the waterfront near Surfside in Sliema. Small square shapes cut into the rock, each with their own set of steps to get in. They are designed so the waves break just before reaching them, so they’re always full, but calm. I hear that back in Victorian times, each of these pools had it’s own little hut above it, with walls to allow the women to bathe in privacy. In those days Malta was just as hot but even a bare ankle was cause for uproar so imagine how important it must have been for these women to have the chance to cool off in the water without causing a scandal.

Sunrise at Surfside, Sliema, Malta

malta_sliema_sunrise_rockpools_sea

This time of day is so peaceful, even with the symphony of colours exploding in the sky. Down on the water’s edge there wasn’t another soul around, apart from the birds, circling just over head, stretching their wings, and warming up their signing voices. The water rippled gently. I always descrive it the same way, like molten lava or liquid metal. It glows golden and metallic like. The waves quietly breaking on the rocks provides a calming soundtrack to the morning.

Sunrise at Surfside, Sliema, Malta Sunrise at Surfside, Sliema, Malta Sunrise at Surfside, Sliema, Malta

I was struck by the varying texture of the waters. The tiny ripples that crisscrossed the open waters, making it appear incredibly mobile even when almost completely calm, contrasting with the complete stillness of the pools more in land. They were as flat as glass, with the occasional movement that was long and much smoother than the water further out.

Sunrise at Surfside, Sliema, Malta Sunrise at Surfside, Sliema, Malta

How easy it is to get so angry, be so moved and react so passionately to the little things that happen during the day. A look, a comment, a torn item of clothing, a broken nail. I was struck by how calming this intense morning experience was and how much we could all benefit from caring less about the small things and taking more time to appreciate the big things, because nature, the universe, our place in the galaxy, those things that cause the sunrise to be what it is, those are the big things. The things that really matter.

4 comments

Scott Lee Holloway 15 September, 2015 - 4:57 pm

Looks beautiful Rhi!

I love your sunset pictures, I share your love of sunsets! :)

Completely off topic so apologies in advance. I am a huge animal lover and love most creatures, but one thing that I am not a fan of is cockroaches. When I visited Malta I only saw them once, near a graveyard in Mellieha, but when we saw them, we literally saw hundreds of them, all together!

Have you ever encountered them? I know they are probably harmless enough but for some reason I really don’t like them. I have no issue with spiders, but cockroaches, for some reason scare me!

Do you ever go inside peoples homes?

Sorry to sound like a complete pansy lol! but I knew you’d be the girl to ask :)

Scott.

Reply
Scott Lee Holloway 15 September, 2015 - 5:02 pm

*Do THEY [the cockroaches] ever go inside peoples homes that was supposed to say! Not, do you lol!

Reply
Rhi 16 September, 2015 - 11:30 am

Hey Scott! I totally understand your question, I absolutely hate the beasts! I don’t know why, as you say, they are harmless but somehow they are terrifying! I will be totally honest with you, they do get inside homes, but so long as you are clean you should be fine. Ground floor flats will suffer the most, so the higher you are, the better, but they’re not a common or big problem. You’ll see them out on the street but certainly not in swarms. We have a product, PifPaf which is INCREDIBLE. It’s full of chemicals and very nasty, but gets the job done. If you find one, spray it with this and it’ll be sorted. It’s unlikely you’d end up with a nest in an apartment, but if that did happen you can spray with PifPaf or at worst, get exterminators in. But this doesn’t really happen in lived in flats, so you should be absolutely. Also yes, I do sometimes go in other peoples homes but only when asked and I’m generally more welcome than a roach HAHA!

Reply
Scott Lee Holloway 16 September, 2015 - 2:21 pm

Haha thanks Rhi!! :)

Glad you understand my apprehension of them haha!

In that case I’ll live on top of Portomaso Business Tower to be as high as possible haha!

Thanks for your help as always!

Scott.

Reply

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